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Next Author in the TakeOver Event

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Charlene Vermeulen currently lives with her handsome husband and two rescue dogs in Pinehurst, NC. A life-long educator, Charlene has taught 6th-12th grade English, Language Arts, and Academically Gifted classes, along with summer writing and art camps, and worked as a school administrator for five years before retiring to spoil her grandchildren. She has two precious daughters, Anna and Grace, whose names appear in the first book in the series, Jess the Mess. Other than family and her Christian faith, her passions include reading, writing, drawing, hiking, traveling, photography, time with family, and painfully bad puns.

 

As feisty Jessica moves to yet another middle school, she struggles to stay out of trouble, while living in constant fear that others will find out her family’s dark secrets: Jess’s mom is an alcoholic, her dad left them years ago, and most days Jess struggles just to find food to eat.
Convinced that she is the reason her mother drinks, especially since Jess constantly gets into trouble at school, she lives with the daily pain of her mom’s explosive behavior, and the accompanying shame.
Befriended by sassy, red-headed Anna and cheerful, encouraging Grace, Jess balances the joy of friendship with the hurt she carries with her.
Will self-proclaimed Jess the Mess open her heart and life to her new friends? What happens when her secrets are revealed? Jess learns that everyone can change, but some change comes with a price.

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Revised Schedule for the Facebook Author TakeOver Event

Meet Saguaro's Authors

Meet our next Author for the Author TakeOver Event

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Janet F. Smart lives in picturesque West Virginia. She is the mother of three grown boys. She enjoys writing for children, bringing her thoughts, dreams and imagination to life. When not outside enjoying nature, she sits at her writing desk, her inner child flowing onto the paper. A flicker of a childhood memory was the inspiration for this novel.

 

After his dad dies in an accident at work, twelve-year-old Teddy Haynes and his mom come back to live with family in rural West Virginia. They hope to start over, but some people say the Russians are going to blow up the United States. How can they start over, if the world comes to an end?

He finds his life filled with talk of bomb shelters, a cat and dog that don’t get along, clinging two-year-old twin nephews and a pretty girl he’s too shy to talk to. To help cope with their fears, Teddy and his friends convert an old cave in the woods into a bomb shelter. Will they be able to work together and pull through the tense-filled months during the Cuban Missile Crisis in the fall of 1962? And will Teddy be able to overcome his grief from the loss of his dad?

Carolyn Savage is our next Author Featured in the AuthorTakeOver Event

 

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C. M. Savage began writing at a young age. She wrote and illustrated her first book when she was in second grade and continued to write off and on through college. After traveling, she enjoyed working with birds of prey, mammals and endangered Hawaiian birds. She is a second degree black belt in Taekwondo, enjoys crafting and volunteers in the library at her children’s school. She currently lives on Maui with her husband and two daughters on their small organic farm. The Gardenia Curse is her debut novel.

Thirteen-year-old Eva Thomas finds herself in a life threatening mystery when her dreams become real. Night after night, she is transported to Dreamland, where an evil being, the Shadow, wants her dead. Exhausted from her troubled sleep, Eva stumbles through her days in a new town where her grandmother is known as an eccentric and in a new school where a bully has decided Eva needs to be put in her place. Can Eva save herself and her dreams before it’s too late?

Meet our next Author on the AuthorTakeOver Event

Lizzie Ross grew up in Tulsa, and has lived and taught in Africa, the UK, and New York City, where she lives. Her first book, Kenning Magic, is available on Amazon, and at Lizzie Ross’s website: LizzieRossWriter.com
Kenning Magic, a new novel by Lizzie Ross, tells the story of Noni, who lives in a world where everyone, including infants, can cast magical spells. Everyone, that is, but Noni herself. But she alone can read; she has what her late mother called the ‘Old Knowing’, and this ability is a secret Noni must keep from everyone, including her best friend, Twig.
When magicians from an enemy country steal everyone’s Magic, Noni knows that she is the only one who can help save them. She must use the ‘Old Knowing’ to find the Book of Spells. Only the Book will enable her countrymen to re-learn Magic and have a fighting chance. Meanwhile, dragons have escaped from the ‘Hold’ and are burning dwellings and eating anything that moves. The enemy mages have learned of the Book of Spells and are also searching for it. Noni, with Twig at her side, must use her wits and whatever luck that crosses her path to reach the Book before it’s too late.

Our next Author TakeOver Author

Our next author to be on the Author TakeOver Event is…Fran Orenstein
 
Fran Orenstein, Ed.D., published author and poet, also edits both poetry and prose. She wrote her first poem at age eight and has written and published academically and professionally since then. This included working as a magazine editor and writer, writing political speeches and material for state government and writing newsletters for various organizations. Her author credits include eleven published books, including middle grade novels, young adult novels, a contemporary adult novel and two adult mysteries, plus a book of poetry, and…there are more books waiting in the wings. Visit Fran’s World at http://www.franorenstein.com for more information.
Her academic credentials are B.A. in Early Childhood Education from CUNY’s Brooklyn College; M.Ed. in Counseling Psych from The College of NJ; and, Ed.D. in Child & Youth Studies from Nova Southeastern University.
 
She has authored many books for children and young adults:
Shadow Boy Mystery Series: Mystery under Third Base – Book 1, Mystery of the Green Goblin – Book 2, Mystery of the Stolen Painting – Book 3, Mystery in Gram’s Attic – Book 4.
Also by Fran Orenstein: The Spice Trader’s Daughter; The Calling of the Flute; Fat Girls from Outer Space; Fat Girls from Outer Space; a Graphic Novel
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Author TakeOver Event Schedule

Meet Saguaro's Authors(1)

Writing for PTP Book Division

Writers of any genre want to make a good first impression. However, if editors see typos or formatting issues as soon as they begin reading your submission, chances are they won’t read all the way to the end before rejecting it.

You’ve already spent a fair amount of time drafting and revising your work. The final step before you submit it should be to have a copy editor look at it. Of course, that costs money, unless you have a copy editor as a friend and he or she is willing to work for you for free. If it’s just not feasible for you to have someone copy edit your work for you, here are some tips to help you review your own writing before sending it to publisher. [As with any submission, be sure to check the publisher’s website for individual formatting preferences.]

  1. Eliminate double-spaces between sentences.

Inserting two spaces between sentences is a habit formed in the days when people used manual typewriters. With word processing programs, such as Microsoft Word, you only need one space following a period or other punctuation that ends a sentence. If you send an editor your story or article with two spaces between each sentence, that editor may make assumptions about you or your technological capabilities before they even read your first sentence.

2.  Ensure consistency of formatting.

If you are submitting prose, check to see that your font size and type are consistent throughout the manuscript. This is especially important if you have been cutting and pasting quotes from outside sources, such as websites or emails.

 

Next, go through your manuscript to ensure that your line spacing and methods of indenting (be sure to use Word’s automatic .5 space indent) paragraphs remain the same from beginning to end. Are you using headers and sub-headers? Make sure you format all headers the same way, and that sub-headers are formatted in a way that is visibly different from the way headers are formatted.

  1. Confirm the spelling of names.

Whether you are quoting another writer, using an epigraph, or writing a journalistic article, confirm that you are spelling a person’s name correctly. Google it, even. If it’s a foreign name, it may contain special characters or accent marks. Microsoft Word allows you to insert characters from just about any language, so there’s no excuse for referencing Gabriel García Márquez without using the accent marks in his name.

This advice also applies to the names of companies, towns, states, and countries. An editor will suspect the veracity of everything else in a journalistic article or nonfiction manuscript if you misspell the names of locations or businesses mentioned in your piece.

  1. Don’t guess at the spelling and accenting of foreign words and phrases.

Many foreign words and phrases have found their way into everyday English usage. When incorporated into poetry or prose, it is often the practice to italicize these words. The first time I saw “Walla!” used instead of “Voilà!” I could not believe the author had not even bothered to check the word’s spelling. Here, too, Microsoft Word’s “insert symbol” feature enables you to use just about any foreign accent or symbol you could possibly need. Our editors will know immediately if you are just being lazy.

 

Saguaro Books Author Takeover Event

Saguaro Books Author Takeover Event on Facebook by Saguaro Books Find out what Saguaro Books is all about and the books we publish SEPT 30, 2017

via Upcoming Event — Nickum’s Nook

Writing Nonfiction

Eight preparatory steps necessary to successfully write a nonfiction book:

  1. Choose your topic.

The first thing you want to do as you prepare to write a nonfiction book is choose a topic for your project carefully. This may seem like a no-brainer, but it really isn’t.

  1. Create a Content Plan

Create an outline or a table of contents for you book. This ends up looking like a table of contents—actually a rather detailed table of contents with chapter titles and subheading titles. You might prefer to just create a simple outline or a bulleted list.

Whatever your method of choice, create something that looks like the structure of a book—a table of contents. And know what content will fill that structure as you create your manuscript. That’s your map.

Then, when you sit down to write each day, you know exactly what to write. In fact, the more detailed you make this plan, the more quickly and easily you will write your book. You will spend little time staring at your computer screen wondering what to write or what comes next. You will know. It will be right there in your writing plan. You’ll just follow the map—your table of contents—to your destination.

  1. Determine What Research You Need

You might think you can write your book “off the top of your head” because you are the expert on the topic. Inevitably, though, you will discover a need to search for something—a URL, a quote, the title of a book. These things can slow down your process. This is where preparation can help keep your fingers on the keyboard typing rather than perusing the Internet.

For each item in your plan—or your detailed table of contents, brainstorm the possible research you need and make note of it.

As you write, if you discover you need more research or interviews, don’t stop writing. Instead, create brackets in your manuscript that say [research here] and highlight them in yellow. Later, do a search for the term “research,” and fill in the gaps.

  1. Create a To-Do List

Look over your content plan. Take all the research items you listed and put them on a to-do list.

Make a list of URLs, books and articles to find. Look for anything you need to do. For instance, does your research require that you visit a certain location? If so, put “Visit XX” on the to do list.

Don’t forget to put interviews on this list. You want to conduct your interviews now.

  1. Gather and Organize Your Materials

Gather as much of your research and other necessary material as you can prior to the end of October. Purchase the books, copy the articles into Evernote.com, copy and past the URLs into a Word doc, or drag them into Scrivener’s research folder, for instance. Get your interviews transcribed as well—and read through them with a highlighter, marking the quotes you think you want to use.

If you are writing memoir, you might want to gather photos, journals and other memorabilia. If you are re-purposing blog posts, or reusing any other previously published or written material, you want to put all of this in one place—an online folder, a Scrivener file or a Word file.

Generally, get as much of what you need to write your book in an easily accessible format and location so you aren’t searching for it when you should be writing. Use piles, boxes, hanging folders, computer folders, cloud storage…whatever works best for you.

  1. Determine How Much Time You Need

Each nonfiction book is different and requires a different amount of time to write. A research based book takes longer to write, for example, because you have to study, evaluate and determine your opinion of the studies. You have to read the interviews you conducted, choose appropriate quotes and then work those quotes into your manuscript.

If, on the other hand, you write from your own experiences, this take less time. With the exception of drawing on anecdotes, an occasional quote or bit of information from a book, the material all comes from your head. You need only sit down and write about a process you created, your own life story or your area of expertise.

  1. Create a Writing Schedule

Last, create a writing schedule. You now know how much time you need to write your book. Now find those hours in your calendar and block them off. Make those hours sacred.

  1. Put a Back-Up System in Place.

Yes…this is my last tip, because you just never know what happens. Your computer crashes or dies. You accidentally delete your whole manuscript. Your child dumps milk all over your keyboard.

You want a back up of your project. Always save it to your computer’s drive and onto a thumb drive or, better yet, into the cloud, for safe keeping! Make these plans in advance as well. You can use Evernote.com, Dropbox.com or Google Drive, for example.

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